Suzuki Gixxer SF FI ABS: The premium sports bike

Published on 2 June, 2022

The Gixxer series is one of the most successful bikes to have been launched by any bike manufacturer in Bangladesh. Bikers of Bangladesh have been going crazy with the Gixxer ever since the first ever version was launched 7 years ago back in 2015. In 2019, Suzuki launched refreshed versions of the Gixxer and the Gixxer SF series and the FI models in 2021. 

 To be completely fair, none of the bikes of the Gixxer series was ever the fastest in their respective class, nor did either ever come with  jaw dropping features. However, this series attracted all bikers for one specific feature- its ‘fun factor’. 

 For this issue of Turbine, we take a detailed look at the top most offering of the Gixxer series- the Gixxer SF FI ABS. 

Visuals 
 The Gixxer-SF is one of the very few flared sports commuter bikes offered in Bangladesh. Though it might not be new to anyone, the new Gixxer and the Gixxer SF are mostly the exact same bike other than the visual changes. When compared to the first version, the newer one is more bulkier yet angular at the same time. The headlight, which completely changes its fascia from the regular Gixxer, gets LED headlamps followed by the rear taillight as well as the indicators. The tank cover might have the same design cue as the older one but the bodykit makes it look certainly a lot more ‘flared-up’ when parked beside the older one. Another notable feature is the newly added split seat which, along with the clip-on handlebar, now takes it to the proper sports bike category only in terms of visuals.  The rim and the exhaust however, are borrowed from the older one.

Features
 The sport commuter segment is undoubtedly one the most competitive categories in the current bike industry of Bangladesh. Hence, this is that one category, apart from the visuals which is subjective, that the bike makers try to make their bikes stand out. The Gixxer SF is offered in both a carburetor and a Fuel Injected (FI) engine variant. Available only with double disks, the carburetor version of the Gixxer SF gets a synchronized braking system while the Fuel Injected variant comes with Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) as standard. Other than that, all variants of the SF come with the clip-on handle bar, split seats and a fully digital gauge cluster.  

Performance 
 When the Gixxer was first launched in 2015, it was already ‘The Perfect’ all rounder bike for many bike enthusiasts. The japan sourced engine, paired with the five speed manual transmission, had adequate power in both the low and the mid range along with a decent top speed figure to top it off. However, with the new refreshed Gixxers, Suzuki decided to reduce the power slightly. The 155cc 4 stroke air cooled engine now produces about 13.9bhp at 8000rpm and 14Nm of torque at 6000rpm for the carburetor variant. While in the FI variant, the power and torque figures for the FI variant are slightly lower at about 13.4bhp and 13.8Nm respectively.

 Many bikers might lean away from the new Gixxer series after seeing the power figures. The most prominent impact is at the top end. However, given the category the Gixxers are competing in, the fuel economy of the bike is a very serious issue. So, Suzuki’s take at the slight decrease in power and the addition of the Fuel Injection system makes it the ideal choice for bikers who want the looks of a sports bike minus its high maintenance and fuel costs.

Test Ride 
  One word- AMAZING! Despite a short test ride never revealing how it may actually be to own a bike for a long time but given the Gixxer SF’s popularity in the bike community, we surely had our expectations high. The Gixxer SF though, didn’t fail to amaze us. 

 From the moment I got on the bike, I was surprised at how comfortable it was. Compared to other flared bikes, the riders don’t need to lean too much to operate the bike making it a lot more bearable for prolonged rides. Part of the reason could be because this bike was intended to be more of a daily commuter than a true sports bike. 

 The throttle needs to be twisted quite a bit before the bike gets some pace which could’ve let me down but given how well balanced it is and how easy it is to lean and go around corners, surely doesn’t 

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